Episode 89: Veterinary Anesthesia with Bonnie Gatson

In this episode, episode 89, I welcome Dr. Bonnie Gatson to the show.  She is a veterinary anesthesiologist and we discuss her training, the differences and similarities between human and animal anesthesia, and the benefits of working together.

8 Replies to “Episode 89: Veterinary Anesthesia with Bonnie Gatson”

  1. I really enjoyed this podcast. Before becoming an AA I did surgery and anesthesia (ketamine intraperitoneum to knock them out and isoflurane to keep asleep) for mice research and this podcast brought back old memories of how I had to perform much of the procedures blindly (no monitors, just watch respirations) and I was never sure on how much pain the mice were in after the procedure. I just had to give subcutaneous lidocaine every 6 hours after the procedure for 3 times total. Before I could officially start the research, I got tested by a vet to make sure I was doing everything properly.

    I also like the thought of cross examining research between humans and animals to further improve medical practice. In a way it is a one way street since all pharmacological medicines are first tested on animals before even getting close to approval for human trials, but the thought of studying animals physiologically is interesting such as comparing a congenital heart defect like TOF vs a reptiles natural 3 chamber heart.

  2. I am a licensed veterinary technician (the veterinary equivalent of a nurse) and my long-term goal is specialize in anesthesia. I’ve been listening to ACCRAC for about a month now and it was beyond exciting to hear a veterinary anesthesiologist hosted on the show! Thanks for this and all the other great podcasts!

  3. Thank you for doing this topic, it really made me smile.

    I’ve been wanting to write you for a while now and this was a very exciting surprise. I learned about ACCRAC from other residents who listened to the show. ACCRAC became a huge part of my studying (during my travel and work outs) this past year. I am…was a veterinary anesthesia and pain management resident who recently took (and passed) my specialty boards this past June. ACCRAC, besides being super interesting in anesthesia related topics, helps to bring out the differences (at least to me) in human versus veterinary medicine. ACCRAC was excellent at reinforcing old knowledge while supplying new and unique tidbits of information along the way.

    Thank you for keeping this Podcast going. I know a lot of veterinarians (residents and specialists) who listen on a regular basis.

    When I was in vet school I was a part of the one health initiative which sort of bridges the gap between human and veterinary medicine. I think we can greatly learn and improve all aspects of health and wellness by learning from each other.

  4. I’m so happy you did this episode, I always think about how veterinary medicine works in a lot of ways, particularly since there is not as many specialties, on average your local town vet is expected to wear a lot of hats that we would never dream of or pretend to know anything about in human medicine. I could listen to another few hours on this subject, I want to hear a case study on tiger surgery!

    I am a CRNA student and I just found your podcast, but I downloaded every episode and have been listening to the backlog every day on my way to school. I especially love the supportive attitude you foster with the “valued and important” mantra at the end of each episode, it is so welcome in a world full of negativity, especially anyone who works in a hospital.

    Mike Pace

  5. I am a veterinary anesthesiologist and a regular listener of your podcast (like Jennie, I also found it helpful when I was studying for boards). This episode was really fun – thank you, Jed, for getting Bonnie on the show, and thanks Bonnie for representing our specialty, well done!

    I work in private practice, at a specialty hospital for dogs and cats. Now that they have an anesthesiologist, they may start performing more procedures on exotic species (we did a fracture repair on a bunny today). I’m already missing the species diversity I enjoyed during residency!

  6. I am a (human) ca3 at militrary hospital. One of my attendings told me a story of when he was deployed with the Marines, a service dog was injured and needed emergency surgery in a small surgical unit in the Middle-of-Nowhere, Afghanistan. He was the only anesthesia provider and had to anesthetize this animal…he told me the military has “hotlines” that providers can call to consult services such as veterinary medicine. The veterinarian essentially walked him through how to do GA on this dog over the phone, which im told went well. This episode was fascinating to me as this may be something i might have to do in the future after i graduate. Thanks for this and i hope there are future episodes like this!

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